Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Monday August 24th, 2015: Theo E.J. Wilson, In Defense of Black Women


Jeannine Etter interviews Community Activist, Black Lives Matter member and National Poetry Slam champion Theo EJ Wilson, on his viral video "In Defense of Black Women" where Mr. Wilson challenges the toxic narrative that Black women are the sole cause of the destruction of the Black Family.

"Hurt people hurt people."


Listen now or Get MP3. 26:48 min.






About Theo E. J. Wilson , also known by his poet handle, “Lucifury,” is a modern Renaissance Man. His natural knack for artistic expression had him dabbling in, and even mastering almost every art form he put his hands to.  Battling manic depression from and early age, this knack would save his life, and shape an award-winning career as a spoken word artist, pianist, actor, singer, rapper, dancer, and activist.  Theo is a founding member of the Denver Slam Nuba team, who won the National Poetry Slam in 2011.

You can follow Theo EJ Wilson on https://www.facebook.com/theo.wilson.31.

Click here to listen to entire show. 59:50 min.

Also on today's show:
Sex Testing and Gender Policing in Sports

Monday August 24th, 2015: Sex Testing and Gender Policing in Sports

"There is no single thing in the body that can be objectively used to sort all males from all females." Rebecca Jordan-Young

Rebecca Jordan-Young, Tow Associate Professor of Women's Gender and Sexuality Studies at Barnard College and author of Brain Storm: The Flaws in the Science of Sex Differences joins Kate Raphael to discuss gender policing and sex testing in sports.



A recent ruling by the International Court of Arbitration for Sport in the case of sprinter Dutee Chand suspended the practice of "hyperandrogenism regulation" by the International Association of Athletics Federations.  Where did this type of sex testing come from, and what does the ruling mean for the future of women's sports? Are we heading to gender neutral sports? What counts as unfair and disproportionate?

Listen now or Get MP3. 26:26 min.






Click here to listen to entire show. 59:50 min.

Also on today's show:
Theo E.J. Wilson, In Defense of Black Women


Sunday, August 23, 2015

Monday, August 24, 2015: Theo E.J. Wilson, In Defense of Black Women; and Sex Testing and Gender Policing in Sports

Tune to KPFA 94.1 FM or www.KPFA.org at 1 PM!!!


Jeannine Etter interviews Community Activist, Black Lives Matter member and National Poetry Slam champion Theo EJ Wilson, on his viral video "In Defense of Black Women" where Mr. Wilson challenges the toxic narrative that Black women are the sole cause of the destruction of the Black Family.





Then Rebecca Jordan-Young, Tow Associate Professor of Women's Gender and Sexuality Studies at Barnard College and author of Brain Storm: The flaws in the science of sex differences joins Kate Raphael to discuss gender policing and sex testing in sports.  A recent ruling by the International Court of Arbitration for Sport in the case of sprinter Dutee Chand suspended the practice of "hyperandrogenism regulation" by the International Association of Athletics Federations.  Where did this type of sex testing come from, and what does the ruling mean for the future of women's sports?


Sunday, August 9, 2015

Monday August 10, 2015: Countering Dehumanization

Challenging Dehumanization

Interview with Margo Perin



We talk with Margo Perin, founder and director of Write & Rise, about how she uses narrative to help incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people, at risk youth, as well as police and their families, heal from trauma.  Perin is the author of the autobiographical novel The Opposite of Hollywood, and contributing editor of the anthologies Only the Dead Can Kill:  Stories From Jail, and How I Learned to Cook and Other Writings on Complex Mother-Daughter Relationships.

"I don't think the system can change unless work is done on both sides." Margo Perin



Listen now or Get MP3. 25:29 min.







Not Throw Away Women: Black and Indigenous Women Disrupt Violence


And from Making Contact: Not Throw Away Women: Black and Indigenous Women Disrupt Violence.  We learn how one community is undoing the silence around the violence women of color face. We also hear about how serial killers were able to hunt down mostly Black women for three decades in South Los Angeles. Then to the Yucatan where pregnant indigenous women struggle under a health care system failing to provide proper medical care.

"If you are a woman of color and you're impoverished, you're at the very bottom and your life is seen as not worth anything."

"We may never know just how many women have died."

Click here to listen to this segment from Making Contact.  There are 4 audio files so be sure to scroll down. 34:21 min.

Host: Laura Flynn and Jasmin Lopez
Contributing Producers: Rochelle Robinson and Karen Stefan Tenorio

Featuring:
Rochelle Robinson, Making Contact Fellow
Kimberly Smith, community member attending Her Resilience mural project
Gabrielle Rae Travis,  Her Resilience Community Outreach Coordinator
Margaret Prescod founder of Black Coalition Fighting Back Serial Murders and host of KPFK’s Sojourner Truth
Mirna Aracely Tuz Acosta, Safe Maternity for the Indigenous Population in East Yucatan
Neyi Amparo Cime Arceo, resident of Xanlah.
Thanks to the Mary Wohlford Foundation for funding towards this program.

For more programs from Making Contact go to: http://www.radioproject.org/.  Making Contact airs every Friday at 3:30 on KPFA 94.1 FM or www.kpfa.org.


Click here to listen to entire KPFA Women's Magazine show. 59:50 min.


Tuesday, August 4, 2015

Monday August 3, 2015 - Allison Green: Tracing Literal and Literary Roots

We speak with Allison Green about her literary memoir, The Ghosts Who Travel With Me. Why would a lesbian-feminist model herself on Richard Brautigan? Listen to Allison read excerpts from her novel. Or Get MP3. 17:30 min.






Available from Indie BoundElliott Bay Book Company, and other booksellers online.
"Curious about her enduring love for Richard Brautigan’s work, Allison Green embarks on a road trip tracing the route of his most famous work, Trout Fishing in America. As she travels, she examines the way we relate to the things that influence us―the ancestors who created us, the past that shaped us, the writers who changed the way we saw the world―and how these things intertwine to make us who we are. The Ghosts Who Travel With Me speaks to a forgotten generation while breaking the confines of traditional memoir."

Click here to listen to entire show. 59:50 min.

Also on today's show:
Interview with Dr. Marcia Chatelain

Events Calendar:
"CONJURE CIRCLE” Opening Night Ceremony & Procession Thursday, 06 AUGUST 2015 | 6:00 PM TO 10:00 PM. For information and to RSVP go to: Oakland.Impacthub.net

“Living in the Shadows of Exclusion” : Asian Americans at the Margins of Family, Faith, Immigration & LGBT Inclusion. Sat. Aug. 8 @ 1pm – Koret Auditorium, main San Francisco Public Library. Free community engagement screening and panel discussion

Monday August 3, 2015 - Marcia Chatelain: History Through the Eyes of Black Girls

How important is Gender, Place and Race to who we become?

Dr. Marcia Chatelain, author of South Side Girls: Growing Up in the Great Migration, discusses the construction of Black girlhood in Chicago in the first half of the twentieth century, and what it tells us about the intersections of race and gender.  In August 2014, Chatelain encouraged educators to talk about the crisis in Ferguson, Missouri via the Twitter hashtag #FERGUSONSYLLABUS. She also talks about how Black Lives Matter is rewriting 2016 and why it’s important that so many of its leaders are women.

Listen now or Get MP3. 30:45 min.


"This is a moment of great pain and of great mourning but boy is this a moment of deep optimism and hope because we are seeing things that we have never seen before."

Order at your local bookstore. Also available on Kindle.

"In South Side Girls Marcia Chatelain recasts Chicago's Great Migration through the lens of black girls. Focusing on the years between 1910 and 1940, when Chicago's black population quintupled, Chatelain describes how Chicago's black social scientists, urban reformers, journalists and activists formulated a vulnerable image of urban black girlhood that needed protecting. She argues that the construction and meaning of black girlhood shifted in response to major economic, social, and cultural changes and crises, and that it reflected parents' and community leaders' anxieties about urbanization and its meaning for racial progress. Girls shouldered much of the burden of black aspiration, as adults often scrutinized their choices and behavior, and their well-being symbolized the community's moral health. Yet these adults were not alone in thinking about the Great Migration, as girls expressed their views as well. Referencing girls' letters and interviews, Chatelain uses their powerful stories of hope, anticipation and disappointment to highlight their feelings and thoughts, and in so doing, she helps restore the experiences of an understudied population to the Great Migration's complex narrative."


Also on today's show:

Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Monday July 20, 2015: 3 Girls Theater




Spiraleena Mason of 3 Girls Theatre joins us to talk about the upcoming New Works Festival, August 3 through 9 at San Francisco’s Thick House, 1695 18th Street, San Francisco.

Find out more about 3 Girls Theatre on Facebook. For tickets and more information about the festival go to 3girlstheatre.org and follow the calendar links. 3 Girls Theatre is hosting a meet and greet for interested women play writers on August 8th. Information is on their website.

Listen now or Get MP3. 12:30 min.






Listen to entire show. 59:50 min.

Also on today's show:
Interview with WHO researcher Meghan Bohren
A Gay Girl in Damascus: The Amina Profile